Enhanced Comfort

Five homes in the Tulsa area are unique in design – contemporary, traditional, transitional – but each incorporates elements of luxury that transform the homes not just into living spaces, but into lavish retreats

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All furnishings, rugs, lighting and wall finishes are new to the home.

All furnishings, rugs, lighting and wall finishes are new to the home.

Light Update

Photography by Nathan Harmon

When the owners of this south Tulsa home called Ginni Jacobs and Jolene Stevens, partners of Broken Arrow’s Ginni & Jolene Designs, to assist with the residential update, the designers were already familiar with the project.

“We started working with the family over 15 years ago,” says Jacobs.

The first remodel doubled the size of the house to 7,000 square feet. The unfinished attic provided enough space to add an apartment, including a bedroom, living area and kitchenette, in addition to another family room with a pool table, a gym, sauna and massage room.

The majority of the existing carpet was replaced with wood floors, and the terra cotta tile was also removed. Travertine tile was installed using an epoxy grout that was buffed and polished, making it appear to be one piece. Ordinary sheetrock-coffered ceilings were detailed with painted wood and beams, while an original pantry is now a wine cooler with a custom iron door. An impressive set of wood-carved arched doors lead to the wife’s office, where a brick fireplace wall was replaced with chiseled quartz.

Landscape architect Kristin Jacobs, owner of KJ Designs, transformed the basic back yard into a luxury spa environment with a full outdoor living area that includes a fireplace, kitchen and bathroom.


Carpet was ripped out and replaced with wood floors throughout the home.


Kristin Jacobs, landscape architect and owner of KJ Designs, transformed the outdoor space.


The attic apartment, complete with kitchenette, was updated in the remodel.

The goal of the newest renovation was to update the older, darker, traditional finishes and furnishings with a lighter, more simplified, transitional style. Virtually all of the furnishings, area rugs, window coverings, lighting and wall finishes in the home are new.

The latest renovation – 18 months long – involved numerous construction changes, including replacing cabinetry in the upstairs kitchenette and the downstairs wet bar area.

“We took a small closet and half-bath to create a large master closet for the husband,” says Stevens.

The master bathroom was completely gutted.

“Instead of a pair of sinks on one side of the room, there are now separate vanities,” she adds.

The original half-vaulted ceiling didn’t work with the new layout, so wood trim was added around the arched window to frame the view from the new bathtub. The more symmetrical new ceiling was sprayed with metallic paint. The countertops are gray marble, and the flooring is a cross-grain travertine tile.


The focal point of the newly redesigned master bath is the arched window trimmed in wood.


A powder room was updated as part of the whole-house renovation.


Burl wood wall sculptures hang in the living room.

Steven Curtis, owner of Homeworks, custom-fabricated all the cabinets and wood details and also crafted several pieces of furniture throughout the house, including headboards, night stands and the dining room table.

Jacobs, an accomplished artist, worked with the homeowners to curate a personal art collection, including the stunning burl wood wall sculpture in the living room. Jacobs’ own art hangs across the living room over the fireplace. She also created custom pieces for the master bedroom and other areas throughout the house.

A specially designed bedroom and bathroom renovation means the homeowners’ grandchild can visit frequently.

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