Starring The Eclectic

An early spring sunset drive through Gaillardia in Oklahoma City turned out to be the biggest surprise of Linda Haneborg’s life.

Her husband Steve, a realtor and entrepreneur, drove to a vacant lot, uncorked Champagne and surprised Haneborg with the gift of the beautiful lot. Today, the lot features a two-story Country French home, a style featured in Tulsa architect Jack Arnold’s portfolio.

“We altered the plans with Lee Hensley, a builder and visionary,” Haneborg recalls. “What he did with a red pencil was amazing.”

The exterior entrance suggests Old-World charm. Inside, a whimsical flair is evident.

“It’s a very eclectic home,” Haneborg says. “There’s a story to everything.” The Haneborgs have not been timid about mixing design styles and collections.

The entry showcases the elegant stairway to the guest quarters and provides glimpses of the living and dining rooms. At first glance, the home seems very traditional. But tucked in a living room corner, near French doors leading to a bar and library, is an antique barber chair.

The heart of the home is the family room/kitchen combo, a generous area designed for entertaining.

“We thought it was fun,” she laughs. It provides great contrast to the oak Army officer’s wardrobe from the Civil War.

“For several years, I admired a painting of a nude in a Taos antique shop,” Haneborg adds. “I bargained for it for two years. She was sent back East for an auction, but finally returned to Taos. I got it. She was meant to be in the living room.”

In the dining room, formal chairs are dressed in zebra stripes, mixing with an Italian camphor glass chandelier and an antique carousel horse.

“The horse now sits atop the glass dining table, an idea from designer Shelly Cook McInroe. I would never have placed her there. I designed a space for her on a buffet. Needless to say, this horse gets around. She sometimes lives in the entry or in front of a fireplace,” Haneborg says.

The heart of the home is the family room/kitchen combo, a generous area designed for entertaining. This space reflects the couple’s love for the West, especially Santa Fe, where they own a condo.

The limestone fireplace hearth showcases an antique Blackfoot ceremonial dress. A ghost chair and ram’s horn lamp complement a Charles M. Russell sculpture and an R.C. Gorman painting.

A 1950s jukebox reflects early marriage but is now a treasured vintage piece.

“We have dance marathons occasionally, so we ‘rock around the clock’ with our 1950s 45s,” Haneborg laughs.

Throughout the home, unique wall treatments, unusual woods, faux finishes and specialty handmade wallpapers add elegant surprises.

The black marble kitchen island and hanging pot rack is an ideal place for displaying Haneborg’s ceramic chickens. The kitchen was designed for easy entertaining. A butler’s pantry often doubles as a bar. This area exudes design style and is a feast for the eye.

The east wing master suite reflects a hushed mood and reveals more of the home’s French personality. An antique, ornately carved white oak fireplace mantel is a striking accessory in the master bedroom.

A morning room introduces the master suite and is Haneborg’s favorite place to read and relax. A gold ghost chair in this quiet setting flanks a Napolean-era tulip table, found in Limoge, France.

This secluded enclave opens to the sheltered outdoor living area, which features a fireplace and large entertaining area. It overlooks a small pool, a favorite place for Cheyenne and Cody, the family dogs.

Throughout the home, unique wall treatments, unusual woods, faux finishes and specialty handmade wallpapers add elegant surprises. The home has the look of the 17th century with a contemporary twist, reflecting the couple’s love for surprises, in interior design and in their marriage.