Virtual Monitor

0
201
Charles Hill is the author behind the award-winning Blog Dustbury. Photo by Brent Fuchs.
Charles Hill is the author behind the award-winning blog Dustbury. Photo by Brent Fuchs.

“I wrote a few pages and put them up. Surprisingly, it’s turned out to be addictive. There were seven pages then. There are 22,000 now.”

Charles Hill, author and publisher of www.dustbury.com, has a few things to say. His award-winning blog, entering its 18th year, entertains, infuriates and provides bountiful food for thought.

You write about everything. “Specialized” is an inappropriate adjective for Dustbury.
If you’ve seen your typical WordPress blog, it has six or maybe eight or 10 or 12 categories. I have 57. Basically, it’s whatever comes to mind. I strive to get five posts up a day. Where they fall is pretty much random. It helps that I have sort of a magpie brain. My attention is easily diverted by almost anything. There aren’t too many things I shy away from writing about. I have a great deal of fun with state legislators and their antics.

How did you get started as a blogger?
It started with a simple bit of foolish pride, if you will. The office sent a couple of us to an HTML class with the expectation of eventually putting up a corporate website. I didn’t learn much from the class, but I walked away thinking, “I could probably do this on my own with a little practice.” I discovered that my Internet service provider at the moment was actually giving away a tiny bit of space, so I said, “Okay,” and I wrote a few pages and put them up. Surprisingly, it’s turned out to be addictive. There were seven pages then. There are 22,000 now.

What’s going to be landing in the “Sooner Land” category soon?
Of late, I’ve been blessed with a lot of stuff from the (Oklahoma State) insurance commissioner, John Doak. When he landed in office, he earned my semi-eternal wrath by sending out a packet of stuff that was, one, unreadable, and, two, had a stack of attachments, which may or may not have contained something else. I’m one of those types that likes information to be functional. He learned his lesson in a couple of months. I’ve got a running commentary on that new class of customer being created for people who have solar (power) systems, are putting power back into the grid and are being charged by the state for it. My angle on that is that it’s probably less than meets the eye, but it’s still annoying.

Comments