Great Companies Spotlight: Energy

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Few would argue that the energy industry quite literally powers our lives, but Oklahomans especially owe a lot to our local energy companies. These companies help power more than cars and homes; they power the economy.

SandRidge Energy
Employ: 1,004

SandRidge Energy, now headquartered in Oklahoma City, began in Amarillo, Texas, five years ago. Greg Dewey, vice president of communications and community relations at SandRidge Energy, says that the move into Oklahoma City has definitely had an impact on the state.

“Oklahoma City is one of the most recession-proof cities in the U.S., and one reason for this is energy companies, SandRidge included,” Dewey says.

Being a new company and a very active driller, Dewey says that Sand Ridge is growing, and that “opportunity” is the key word.

“It’s a collaborative environment and employees have the unique opportunity to share ideas and innovate here,” he says. “We have a family atmosphere that is special for our growth.”

Sand Ridge is looking to hire hard workers with a high level of character.

New Dominion, LLC
Employ: 100

Another benefit of the energy industry is the decrease of foreign oil dependence, says chief operating and financial officer of New Dominion, LLC Tim Cargile. And this only begins the impact of energy companies.

“We as Oklahomans can produce hydrocarbons from our land that create wealth for our citizens and generate tax dollars to fund our state budgets and rebuild our infrastructure,” Cargile says.

New Dominion digs into Oklahoma’s economy with several hundred wells and is budgeting for 60 more next year.

“We operate over 300 wells in Oklahoma that will generate over $250 million in gross revenues,” Cargile says.

New Dominion focuses on the highly technical process of dewatering, made possible by the company’s strong management and field teams, Cargile adds.

New Dominion’s advanced technology and opportunities for internal promotions also make the company a great one to work for, and the company is hiring in its Land Department and hopes to add 20 new positions in 2012.

Chaparral Energy
Employ: 650

Chaparral Energy might seem small compared to some of the larger energy companies in Oklahoma, but employee relations manager Kyle Essmiller says that their size is actually beneficial.

“Chaparral is small enough that employees get broad exposure and a wide breadth of opportunity,” Essmiller says. “And we’re also big enough to offer perks.”

Chaparral is in a position to grow, Essmiller says, and plans to hire for more than 60 new positions, ranging from engineers to accountants.

In addition to job creation, Chaparral’s field work in rural areas positively impacts the state.

“Our annual Oklahoma payroll is approximately $50 million, and our annual tax payments are approximately $40 million,” Essmiller says.

Yet, Oklahomans should realize that the energy industry, while growing like never before, is not a new phenomenon.

“The energy business has been a part of Oklahoma history since the beginning, and it will continue to be so,” Essmiller says. “Oklahoma is very rich in the ground still, and the role and impact of energy going forward can be huge… even national.”

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