Bridal Makeover

In the midst of planning the flowers, location, cake and the dress, sometimes the most important item can get neglected – the bride. All the beautiful flowers in the world or the best designer dress won’t cover up a tired and worn out bride. We’ve talked to experts to give brides some helpful hints on ways that they can feel and look great, inside and out.

Getting Into Shape

Brides may tend to put this off until it becomes crunch time where crash diets and crazy exercise routines can often lead to counteractive results.

Amy Ory of Amy’s Fitness Company encourages brides to start the health and wellness journey as soon as they get the ring on their finger.

“Getting healthy and in shape is not a mad scramble,” says Ory. “With health and wellness, there is no finish line; you want to adopt a healthy lifestyle, one that will last long after the honeymoon is over.”

Ory is an advocate of strength training because it burns much more fat that cardio alone. Pushups, squats, sit ups and lunges are all exercises she recommends that require no equipment, gym or even a huge amount of time.

“These can all be done in between errands, while you are watching the news or talking on the phone,” says Ory. “There is no need for fancy equipment or gym memberships, and you can still get into great shape.”

Skin and Makeup

Stress doesn’t even begin to decribe the pressure most brides put themselves through. Most likely, the dress, venue and flowers are top priorities. However, a bride can never plan too early for her bridal look. That doesn’t just mean makeup, either. Many factors contribute to that perfect look.

Bonnie Montgomery, licensed aesthetician and owner of The Skin Boutique, offers a few helpful hints.

Plan for your skin care preparations by booking an appointment with an aesthetician at least three months prior to the occasion. When considering an aesthetician, look for those who offer:

• Complimentary consults. This is the time to have your skin analyzed so that your goals can be determined. A professional aesthetician will prepare a skin care protocol based on professional services needed as well as at-home care. This appointment should also be used to book the necessary appointments needed for treatments.  

• Waxing. Book a consultation appointment at least four weeks prior to the ceremony. Based on the client preference and needs, this service should be performed two days prior to the ceremony. This will allow plenty of time for skin that might have been irritated to heal. If waxing the face, eyebrows or lip, always remember to apply sunscreen with at least an SPF of 30 to the area that has been waxed. Waxing is an exfoliation process, and the exposed skin is prone to sunburn.

• Makeup. If hiring a makeup artist/aesthetician, begin the interviewing process at least six months in advance. It is extremely important that you take your time with this process and make the best selection for you. This is your day, your look. Most professional makeup artists/aestheticians will offer a complimentary consultation, but always check individual or company policy. If on-site services are needed, an up charge may also apply.

Hair

Shawna Burroughs, a hair stylist with Jara Herron Medical Spa & Hair Salon, specializes in bridal hair. She suggests coming in at least three months early for a consultation and either bring the dress or a picture of the dress so you can both decide the best look.
Burroughs also suggests doing two trial runs before the big day, and one of them should be on the same day as the dress fitting.
The more detailed the dress, she suggests a very sleek and simple look for the hair, either in a high bun (which is a new trend) or pulled back in a low ponytail.

If the dress is a halter-style, Burroughs suggests wearing the hair down, but tucked behind the ears for a very clean look that accentuates the halter.

And for a simple dress, add more detailing to the hair, such as soft curls or braids. She also mentions that more brides are choosing a hairpiece to wear in their hair after the veil is taken off, anything from a flower or a feather to something more intricate.

Bottom line, Burrough says, to do what feels most comfortable. If a woman wears her hair up most of the time, then she should do an updo and vice versa.